A Thursday Interruption: Rihanna!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypgXMcQNpdM

Rihanna and Chris Brown reunite on “Birthday Cake.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gzlTJl6bsaU

The above response may be triggering because of its references to rape.

Anyways, here’s another single from the cocknbullkid

And some Nicki Minaj:

And finally, something that’s COMPLETELY AWESOME:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1NXy9qrNv8&feature=branded

Comments

  1. SunlessNick says

    I guess with all the insistant sympathy for Brown, both among fans and within the industry itself – as well as ridiculous stuff like the Grammys appropriating the status of victimhood over the assault – Rhianna must have been feeling a lot of pressure to make some public gesture of forgiveness or reconciliation. Of course now it will be used against her whatever she does, or whatever happens to her.

  2. Red says

    Really, are people so selfish, so wrapped up in themselves that they cowardly turn a blind eye to this sort of thing when it happens in such a public manner with a celebrity? Why do we make excuses instead of just facing the fact? Do we REALLY CARE when stuff like this happens, or is it just lip service? Are we SERIOUS about holding people like this to a higher standard, or are we just too weak to take a stand when it’s a celeb, just becauae they’ve made money playing music? DO we,hold them to a higher standard of behavior and call ou their bwhavior or DON’T we? If not, then how can we be expected to come through for those who do the same thing, but are NOT celebs?

    C’mon, people… either we DON’T SUPPORT ABUSE or we do. No picking and choosing just because it involves a celeb. No wimpy excuses. Reacting violently is A CHOICE. You can’t ‘make’ someone do the crap Brown did.

    Rant over. Sorry. Preaching to the choir here…

  3. says

    Red,

    We do support abuse in this culture. I have a feeling you were being rhetorical, but let’s get real. When a young white guy from a good family rapes somebody, we fall all over ourselves to explain away his fault in it. We routinely refuse to tell bosses the truth or call them on behavior that wouldn’t be tolerated in their subordinates. Yes, absolutely, our culture has evolved to support not only the idea of hierarchical power distribution, but also hierarchical privilege, and finally the idea that privilege should rightfully include the right to harm those below you in the hierarchy.

  4. Nathaniel says

    And right on cue, there is now a story out saying that Chris Brown has nearly assaulted his grandmother.

    There will always be assholes like him. But the public support of this putz is disgusting.

  5. Red says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    I was, but really… what’s the POINT? People complain about the state of the world, yet fail to see the irony when those who act as Brown did are excused for whatever reason.

    Do people who do that, who make excuse for Brown and others like him evenreally care about anyone else aside from themselves? Do theyreally not see how selfish and petty they arebeing, how they perpetuate this sort of thing,thereby ALLOWING IT to happen to others?

    How can we even BEGIN TO HOPE to progress as a society if we are too weak, too selfish to stand up and hold people in such public positions accountable for their actions?

    The answer; we can’t. Because we let ourselves get beaten down by such people. Because we choose not to see OURSELVES as people who have the right, the DUTY to say ‘No’.

  6. says

    Red: Do people who do that, who make excuse for Brown and others like him evenreally care about anyone else aside from themselves? Do theyreally not see how selfish and petty they arebeing, how they perpetuate this sort of thing,thereby ALLOWING IT to happen to others?

    I think selfishness is a big part of it. I also think people who have compassion and empathy make one big mistake frequently: they try to relate to abusive personalities. They try to imagine what would make them (the empathetic person) want to beat their wives, for example, and come up with some form of extreme provocation, which is what it would take to push an empathetic person to beat someone at length. Then they assume the dv/rapist/abuser must’ve been extremely provoked. It sounds rational, but it’s based on a lack of information: some people don’t have empathy, so they enjoy harming others, and provocation is either not required, or can be so ridiculously slight as “she stopped licking my boots for 10 mortally insulting seconds.”

    Once you realize how differently people without empathy see the world, you stop trying to find a way to relate to them, and accept that you are never going to find a reason for their actions that will resound with you emotionally.

    So I think ignorance is part of it, and that’s why I’m a big fan of telling people about psychology and profiling, because that’s the big key: once you understand that evil is a matter of psychology and not lack of religion or presence of demons, things start making so much more sense.

  7. Jolene_Germany says

    She should never hang aroung with him again or at least, not get close to him again.

    AFAIK, it has proven that people who behave in an aggressive way are very likely to do it again…
    Rihanna deserves better than that!

  8. says

    Jolene_Germany,

    Whatever Rihanna needs to do is 1) her decision and 2) complicated by the public’s obsession with her trauma. I honestly don’t remember the last time I saw Rihanna’s name without Chris Brown’s right next to it. As long as the public refuses to give her peace or privacy, her decisions on how to handle the situation will obviously be affected by the public’s reaction.

    And you know, if she doesn’t make a public show of forgiveness, she’s a selfish bitch. If she does, she’s a coward and a weakling. She can’t win. Like it or not, how she handles this situation publicly is part of her image and affects her career.

    That’s without going into how even non-celebrity women can’t always choose when or where they interact with their abusers again. Very often we’re bound by familial, social, or business ties. If you leave every situation the bastard shows up in, you’re still being punished by what he did to you.

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