Chocolate Worship

There’s this advert for MagnumEquador Dark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh_9ZN7Dn4k.

A clearing in the jungle with dozens of women, together with a high priestess, conducting a ritual before an idol carved in the shape of a magnum; at the end, a (female) voice-over says “Magnum Equador Dark:  I’m a worshipper.”

Yes, women worshipping chocolate is a big stereotype, but this time it doesn’t bother me.  Maybe because it carries the stereotype to such a demented extent that no one can think it’s meant seriously.  Or perhaps because it’s a stereotype that’s just as often used by women for their own entertainment.  Or perhaps because there are no men in the ad at all – no male high priest or avatar of the chocolate – and that’s rare enough to deserve marking in itself.  Or maybe I want to cut it slack because I think the product is good.
Or I’m just a sucker for the Mesoamerican imagery.

I wonder if it ought to bother me, and why it doesn’t bother me.  But re-watching it while writing this, it struck me that none of the women look at the camera, always at the idol or their “communion lollies” – but they are always filmed from an angle where you can see
their faces, which are intent on what they’re doing – no vacant looks or sultry glances.  Just like people.

Comments

  1. Sylvie says

    When woman are depicted eating food items of a certain shape – lollies, bananas – adverts often make it suggestive. I once saw an ad in a computer magazine for a little phone or something and the female model was holding it in front of her lips and of course the damn phone was shaped like a penis. (I put to you, who wants a penis-shaped phone?) In this ad, I was actually waiting for the BJ imagery, and when they crunched on their popsicles I was sort of surprised. For that reason alone, I like the commercial.

  2. Jennifer Kesler says

    I like the commercial, and I think you nailed several reasons, Nick.

    The women are doing something passionate and sensual that’s not sexual at all and doesn’t involve men. Even the way they eat the food is, as Sylvie points out, food-lust and not referencing an edible phallic symbol.

    Plus, the imagery is just kind of cool, and it’s nice to see women get something like that. And they’re targeting women not because women eat chocolate and isn’t that a funny stereotype, but because women will pay money for chocolate. In fact, unlike the usual target audience of indiscriminate young men, women will pay extra for quality chocolate. Which is the vibe I get from this commercial: “Our chocolate is for serious chocolate lovers, not the ones who have time to do a funny skit or look all sexy while they’re eating it.”

    I’m glad you reported on this because it’s a great example of how subtle is the difference between a commercial that really targets women and one that still essentially speaks to men but figures the women will listen to.

  3. says

    And they’re targeting women not because women eat chocolate and isn’t that a funny stereotype, but because women will pay money for chocolate. In fact, unlike the usual target audience of indiscriminate young men, women will pay extra for quality chocolate. Which is the vibe I get from this commercial: “Our chocolate is for serious chocolate lovers…”

    See, I knew there’s was something important to the whole” plus it looks yummy” thought that popped into my head.

    I bow down to BetaCandy’s more insightful elaboration on that thought.

  4. Jennifer Kesler says

    Mickle, you were just demonstrating my point: we are a good, paying audience, dammit. :D

    I’d certainly buy this brand and try it if I ever saw it anywhere.

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