Dr. Scholl’s (For Her!!)

Share on Tumblr

Good news! Dr. Scholl’s has created an alternate solution to surgically injecting collagen into the balls of the feet, for women who want to wear their 4-inch stilettos all the time. Basically, it’s their gel inserts with more cushion. Revolutionary technology such as this will enable women to wear their heels while doing yoga, mowing the lawn and taking a bubble bath, as evidenced by the commercial [not available online].

Now, if you’ve been around this site long enough, you know that I have issues with women sacrificing their health for fashion. This whole concept just boggles my mind; I won’t suffer in a shoe only because it’s cute, for example. The posture a high heel induces is, to me, unnatural and uncomfortable. I don’t care how “sexy” the heels-posture is (And who decided it was sexy for a woman’s back to be arched that way and for her butt to be pushed out as far as possible? I’m guessing men.).¬†You should be able to have decent, proper¬†posture without contorting the calf and back muscles.

Getting back on track and back to the commercial, I am troubled most not by the fact that it’s a solution for a problem that doesn’t have to exist. My trouble spots come from the unrealistic nature of the activities women are doing in it. On the plus side, I love seeing women being active in sports and doing daily chores like yardwork – I really like the woman in the mechanic’s shop. On the negative side, I don’t believe for one second women who do these activities care about wearing 4-inch stilettos while doing them. They’re rough and tough jobs and activities (except for the bubble bath, which is just ridiculous)…yet the women in the commercial look pretty and delicate and rawr sexy in their killer shoes.

I know the commercial is simply trying to demonstrate how wonderful the product is, that if a woman wanted to do all these things wearing heels, now she could. It just makes as little sense to me as those old Easy Spirit commercials with the women playing basketball in their pumps. Even less sense, actually. And like the Easy Spirit ad, I find myself not really believing the product can do what it claims.

Incidentally, if you want more cosmetic and surgical tips and you’re in the US, you can watch TLC’s repeat of Fashion Fanatic: Shoes and Handbags this coming Friday, the 24th. In it Stacy London extols the virtues of all the wonderful procedures you can have done (collagen in the ball of your foot, in your toes, a chemical peel to remove calluses – having had the chemical peel on my face, I cannot imagine the agony it would cause on the feet…) in order to wear those shoes you love, without the pain.

Please note my sarcasm.

Comments

  1. says

    Well, admittedly, I prefer to wear high-heels over ballet-flats and stuff, because it’s nearly impossible to find the happy median that doesn’t cost some stupidly high price, and also because small heels (1-2 inches or so) are about as good as shoe inserts (and much easier to find that fit), and ballet flats really hurt my feet. I have a pair of 3 inch sandals and boots that I love – but I never (I mean, seriously) wear them when I’m going to be walking/standing a lot – it’s just that the extra inches really make me look that much older.

  2. sbg says

    There’s a distinct difference between wearing super high heels on occasion and wearing ONLY super high heels, I think. The commercial might have been more effective for me if they’d attempted to show a woman in, say, business attire going home after a long day on her feet…and NOT being in pain because she’s got their fabu inserts in her shoes.

    Long-day-at-work commercials involving women are usually hawking either bubble bath or chocolate, though.

  3. DM says

    High heels create an interesting effect (and I admit I love how legs look in them), but I want to know what logic exists behind being expected to or voluntarily spending so much bloody time in them. I would never walk so much as three blocks in four-inch spike heels anymore than I would walk three blocks in ballet pointe shoes. Those are strictly inside/tiny steps/performance/keep-a-pair-of-sneakers-on-hand shoes to me.

  4. Jennifer Kesler says

    I like the idea of any ad showing women doing “man’s work”.

    But they’re (perhaps inadvertently) emphasizing the idea that women want to or should wear high heels in the most impractical situations for them. I mean, even if your 4 inch heels are perfectly comfy, a construction site is absolutely the wrong place for a narrow heel that can get lodged between two boards, you know?

  5. sbg says

    But they’re (perhaps inadvertently) emphasizing the idea that women want to or should wear high heels in the most impractical situations for them. I mean, even if your 4 inch heels are perfectly comfy, a construction site is absolutely the wrong place for a narrow heel that can get lodged between two boards, you know?

    Indeed.

    I have the same kind of reaction to the Macy’s shoe ad with the dreamy music (Heaven by I Monster, I think) and the women floating gracefully around a vineyard picking grapes. I think Macy’s even has one with the women (in their fantastic shoes) using hoes and shovels.

    I just…what exactly is this ad saying? Or is it saying nothing?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.