Hathor Watch-Along — S3 Ep1: “Basics, Part II”

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:squints:

Huh. No where in that theme does it hint at SPACE PRIMITIVES ARE GONNA TAKE YOUR WOMEN, but hey, whatever. That’s pretty much what this episode is about, what with Chakotay all upset that “his” son is getting raised by Seska and with the major plot points getting driven home by Kes getting manhandled by some “primitive” aliens.

Okay, where we last left off, the crew of the Voyager had been summarily ejected from the ship because of the Kazon being greedy space pirate-primitives and Seska being all TRAITOR-IFFIC to a Federation crew she doesn’t give two snaps for ANYWAYS because she’s a CARDASSIAN DOUBLE AGENT. Also, she’s the only woman who’s had more than one sexual partner, lies to EVERYBODY, claims to be raped, and then LOLLERSKATES has a baby by the wrong man BY ACCIDENT. I guess bad women get punished by having to bear children by the wrong men? Because since she’s a Cardassian, she’d already had to steal and manipulate Chakotay’s DNA to get pregnant with HIS baby. Either the Kazon have super sperm or she got experimented on without her consent… either way, that’s gross.

I hear tell that Seska’s such a big bad in the series that even though she totally dies in this episode, her badness will REVERBERATE THROUGH TIME to get the crew in like s6. ….Is it bad I’m kinda thrilled by that? Like, I feel like gender politics in this show for conventionally attractive women are like a scene from How I Met Your Mother.

So, I’m kinda thrilled that at least the actress looks like she’s having fun being so bad. I kinda want her to eat someone’s brains.

Anyways, the Voyager crew are on a desert planet with a strange beast that eats people and some primitives so primitive that the Universal Translator can’t work with it. The Doctor and the resident “sociopath,” Lon Sudar, are the members of Star Fleet on the ship, so they start mucking about with the systems. This presents Sudor with a moral quandary, because since he really LIKES killing people, he’s afraid that if he lets his monster-side out too much, it’ll destroy him. Fortunately, he gets shot and dies, so, y’know, we don’t need to worry about exploring that.

Hooray! Everyone learns a thing or two about how friendship is magic.

Ha, you thought I was going to link to the NEW MLP, but I didn’t. I win! But seriously, I’d like to point out how Ember the pony all jumped off that cliff right there. This is similar to a lesson I learned from this ep: babies and small children inexplicably have near death experiences, by breathing “bad air” on strange new planets, jumping onto rocks surrounded by lava, or by getting mothered by EVIL WOMEN WHO LIE. I guess kids worlds over are the same. Anywho, Chakotay rescues a kid (not his, in case you were wondering!), everyone on the planet is happy, and then Paris comes and saves them.

Best Janeway moment: When Neelix starts to be all OMG I GOT SOMEONE KILLED and Janeway’s like, “THERE’S NO TIME TO WORRY ABOUT BLAME,” and starts telling her crew that not only are they not going to die, she’s ordering them to survive SO HARD they’re gonna eat bugs if they have to.

 

 

Comments

  1. M.C. says

    What I liked best about Basics is that it ended season 2, which was the weakest imo. Season 1 started strong, season 3 had Sarah Silverman and started the Paris/Torres romance, season 4 introduced 7-of-9, who was a very interesting character and I would have enjoyed her even more if Braga hadn’t insisted on putting her in a catsuit and high heels (wtf Braga?)

    But season 2 was so blah that I barely remember watching it. Seska for instance could have made a good villain, but she seemed so one dimensional compared to that other Cardassian villain on DS9: Gul Dukat.
    And it’s funny that this is coming from me, because usually I’m not with those who argue that DS9 was superior to VOY. Sure, DS9 had better characterisation and reaaaalllllyyy long archs, but VOY was more fun and stayed faithful to the hopeful once-we’ve-settled-our-differences-humanity’s-future-is-bright spirit of Star Trek.

    So, I guess the point of my posting is that I was disappointed in how the Seska arch played out and was glad it was over…
    btw: whatever happened to the poor baby?

  2. Shaun says

    So I have no idea what was happening before you took up your summary, and I have only slightly more idea what actually happened IN this episode, but I just want to say, after following your story and all the videos attached that I think you should have a TV show and I would totally watch it.

  3. Maria says

    M.C.,

    I looked at the wiki for this ep, and basically, yeah, everyone was disappointed with how Seska ended up (no confrontation between her, Janeway, or Chakotay, no BIG BAD VILLAINESS ending) and that some writers were kinda down that the baby didn’t die, since they’re not ever gonna return to that as a plot-point.

    I wonder if the baby would be a Federation citizen?

    Anywho, I was at first excited about the Seska arc, in the same way I was excited about Faith in Buffy: there’s nothing more awesome than a really good redemption/damnation story, and I think the actress could’ve delivered one of those in spades… if she’d been allowed to.

    Hopefully the next ep will be less horrible.

    I also kinda want someone to really question how Voyager wants the aliens to share stuff like ALL THE TIME (medical technology, natural resources, etc), but NEVER wants to share their stuff. No wonder this show feels like a really big Adventure of the British Explorers in SPAAAAAAAACE.

  4. M.C. says

    Maria:
    I was at first excited about the Seska arc, in the same way I was excited about Faith in Buffy: there’s nothing more awesome than a really good redemption/damnation story, and I think the actress could’ve delivered one of those in spades… if she’d been allowed to.

    Yeah, sometimes I feel like it’s hard to find a good female hero in film/tv, but it’s nearly impossible to find a good female villain. 50% of those villainesses are just the mistress to the bigger badder male villain (like Seska turned out to be) and the other 50% just need the love of the male hero and they will turn away from the dark side. (Yes, Steven Moffat, I’m looking at you! How the fuck did you manage to ruin River Song so much?!)

    Tess Mercer on Smallville was cool. Plus she got this awesome ending in which she chooses to die just to get her revenge: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r5FlM_KDx0
    I know, Tess’s backstory was all about how her father and brother had abused her, but yet it never felt like she was defined by those men in her life.

    And the Borg Queen in later seasons of Voyager did turn out to be a fairly interesting villainess, who was neither one-dimensional nor did she care about any man in particular. There were whole episodes dedicated to her and Janeway fighting over who gets 7-of-9’s loyalties.
    Come to think of it, 7-of-9 might have been added as eye candy, but she was not only a greatly fleshed out character, but also the one with the most female/female relationships: she fought to free herself from the Borg Queen’s influence, she had this complex mentor/student relationship with Janeway, she banged heads with Torres because they were so different, and she was friends with Naomi who was the only one who could understand what it’s like to go home to a home you’ve never actually been to.

    God, I miss Voyager. Sure, it hat flaws, big flaws, but what kind of SciFi shows do we get nowadays? Fringe and Warehouse 13 are fun, but everything else is about those manly men (who are of course white, straight and cisgendered).

  5. says

    M.C.,

    The baby was actually the Kazon’s son, & I remember that when Seska died, he grabbed the child and disappeared. The infant would NOT be a Federation citizen because neither of his parents were members of the Federation. If anything, the baby would be a citizen of the Cardassian Empire (assuming he would be accepted: on DS9, Bajoran-Cardassian products of rape were NOT accepted by the Cardassians, and the Bajorans weren’t exactly accepting either).

  6. Maria says

    Gategrrl,

    Ohhh. So the Cardassian treaty that the Maquis keep mentioning isn’t about blurring the boundaries between those two political powers, but is really more a ceasefire and concession of lands?

  7. M.C. says

    Maria:
    Gategrrl,

    Ohhh. So the Cardassian treaty that the Maquis keep mentioning isn’t about blurring the boundaries between those two political powers, but is really more a ceasefire and concession of lands?

    Basically there was a war between Cardassia and the Federation. The treaty ended the war and redefined the Federation-Cardassian borders, buffered by a demilitarized zone. However, the new border gave Cardassia jurisdiction over several worlds inhabited by Federation colonists and the other way around. Disgruntled colonists, who felt the Federation had failed them, formed the resistance movement: the Maquis.

    So it wasn’t like European’s colonising other continents, it was more like Austria & France fighting over who gets to rule over Poland in the 18th century, wihout asking anyone who’s actually Polish.

  8. Maria says

    M.C.,

    LOL the British Empire ref was actually more for Voyager itself — it’s got a very Master and Commander vibe at times, what with Janeway constantly insisting that they’re a Federation crew that will damn well follow EVERY PORTION of Federation rules…… unless for some reason she’s not, and they want something from another species.

    Re: this treaty: this would be in DS9? I’m thinking of watching this one for ABW.

  9. Finbarr Ryan says

    Maria:

    Re: this treaty: this would be in DS9? I’m thinking of watching this one for ABW.

    DS9 definitely got the most mileage out of Maquis, but the storyline has its roots in TNG episodes. The first mention of the Federation-Cardassian Border Wars is in TNG’s fourth season episode The Wounded, but the real seeds of the Maquis come in Season 7’s Journey’s End, which deals with the treaty and its immediate consequences for Federation colonists. This leads into the DS9 Season 2 two-parter The Maquis, where the conflict really begins, and is revisited sporadically until DS9’s fifth season.

    I would definitely recommend DS9, if for no other reason than the existence of Kira Nerys, who is a complete badass (and kind of a tribute to TNG’s always awesome Ro Laren, who also gets involved in the Maquis storyline in TNG’s penultimate episode Preemptive Strike.) :D

  10. M.C. says

    Maria:
    M.C.,

    LOL the British Empire ref was actually more for Voyager itself — it’s got a very Master and Commander vibe at times, what with Janeway constantly insisting that they’re a Federation crew that will damn well follow EVERY PORTION of Federation rules…… unless for some reason she’s not, and they want something from another species.

    Oh well, you’re right. She does that.

    Re: this treaty: this would be in DS9? I’m thinking of watching this one for ABW.

    The whole Cardassia/Bajor/Maquis story line starts in TNG, but it plays a bigger part in DS9 because one of the main characters – Kira – is Bajoran.
    What is Bajor you ask? It’s a non-Federation planet that was colonized by the Cardassians. And by “colonized” I mean that there was genozide and slavery involved.
    DS9 is a show of great quality, but it’s way darker than any other Star Trek has been (maybe should be)…

  11. Maria says

    M.C.,

    I remember Kira! Nariz means “nose” and I remember thinking it was a clever pun for a Bajoran character. Ferengi also means syphilis in some dialects.

    I’ve actually watched a few eps of DS9, but was at an age where a show with such long running plots was too difficult.

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