Links of Great Interest: Bleeeeeergh

Signal Boost: The 3rd Annual Loving Me Girls’ Conference needs funding!

Oh my. Budget cuts as a household budget.

DNA talks about the Million Download Campaign.

Scientific American talks about benevolent sexism.

Oh, Republicans. I say that at least once a week now.

Twelve year old suspended for saying “I love you.”

From Patrick:

Tennessee “bathroom bill” sponsor threatens physical violence against
transwomen.

(Trigger warning for rape, emotional violence, and slut shaming) From Aerin:

A woman received a friend request on facebook from her rapist and
this is how she responded.

From Dom Camus: When reality TV gets real.

On Lisbeth.

A discussion of patterns in fandom.

A MAP of Panem.

GO CALIFORNIA!!!!!!!!!

Makeovers for everyone!

OH MY GOD DANIEL RADCLIFFE!

More on PP and Komen.

Thoughts on Republican campaign strategies.

The legal after-life of Alan Turing.

Ellen DeGeneres talks about Prop 8.

Iris even worse than Siri.

Disney’s newest princess

Trigger warning for DV.

Oh, Marvel. Your fail is contaminating Kitty Pryde.

A father responds to his daughter’s FB post.

Comments

  1. says

    The Benevolent Sexism article is awesome – it’ll be a handy term for explaining why positive stereotypes are not better than negative ones, and how we’re not just “overreacting”. But it goes one step further and explains exactly where we’re at on the social justice front right now:

    While “old fashioned” forms of discrimination may have died down quite a bit (after all, it really isn’t quite as socially acceptable in most areas of the world to be as explicitly sexist and/or racist as people have been in the past), more “benevolent” forms of discrimination still very much exist, and they have their own sneaky ways of suppressing equality. Unaffected bystanders (or perpetrators) may construe benevolently sexist sentiments as harmless or even beneficial; in fact, as demonstrated by Becker and Wright, targets may even feel better about themselves after exposure to benevolently sexist statements. This could be, in some ways, even worse than explicit, hostile discrimination; because it hides under the guise of compliments, it’s easy to use benevolent sexism to demotivate people against collective action or convince people that there is no longer a need to fight for equality.

    It took Susan Faludi several chapters to distill this then-unfamiliar concept in Backlash. Now they’ve whittled it down to a near-soundbyte, so actual comprehension may start any minute now. ;)

    I almost didn’t read the one about reality TV, but then it grabbed me, and it made me cry. I wish Bravo had had the courage to NOT keep the abuse off screen. I know, legal considerations, felonies on film – it’s certainly not their fault alone. We have this whole system that protects predators, and it pisses me the hell off.

    Not being a Potter fan, I’ve never really paid attention to Radcliffe one way or another, but good for him! We have this really screwy way of thinking: the richer someone is, the more perks/freebies we give them.

    I’ll reserve my “yay California” for when they actually get this thing struck down completely, once and for all, and there’s no higher court for it to go to. And that’s going to be the US Supreme Court, I think, and I just don’t know how that will go. I think legally Prop 8 is on awfully shaky ground, and the appeals court has it right. But some of the current justices on SCOTUS don’t seem to know the law as well as your cousin that used to stick Boston baked beans up his nose.

    I have nothing to add about Emily McCombs. Except I’m just thrilled she’s been able to process this and get to the point where she could deal with her attacker as she did. This, sadly, is not such an unusual situation – date rapists seem to commonly assume rape is a normal part of dating, and that the relationship is healthy, and aren’t things going well and when’s the next date.

    The father’s response to his daughter’s Facebook is, um, wow, and the commenters are too stupid to live. He’s not punishing her for being ungrateful. He’s punishing her for venting to her friends, which is, hello, something teens do. Clearly, he’s more disturbed about the public nature of it – about her connecting with people outside the family and maybe getting some support – than he is with her behavior. And the “cleaning lady” definitely sounds like something the IRS and Social Security Admin might like to hear about, unless he’s declaring the value of her services.

  2. Maria says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    Here’s a summary of what I’ve been saying to other people about the dad shooting the girl’s laptop.

    1. We don’t know who she is as a creative person, as a writer, as an artist, etc. As someone who began writing poetry, prose, short stories, etc at 12? This would have destroyed years of work, progress, and brainstorming. I’d be crushed. Destroying her laptop in no way mirrors her disrespect — it’s a nuclear option when someone just flipped you off.

    2. If she were an adult woman in a relationship with an adult man, who just shot her laptop for communicating with friends? We’d call it domestic violence. Because she’s legally a child? It’s discipline. This is why childrens’ rights matter.

    3. This is LAZY PARENTING. It’s way easier and more satisfying to shot someone’s possessions than to monitor their use consistently and enforce boundaries.

    4. I see where the daughter gets her propensity for public, verbally abusive rants.

    5. How is she going to do the schoolwork she’s complaining about without a laptop?

  3. says

    Maria,

    Excellently said. What’s also bothering me about this is how much it mirrors Hilary Adams’ situation, and we all know what was really going on there. What it’s really about is that there’s this tiny corner of her life that isn’t entirely dominated by this man, and he cannot stand it. So he shoots the thing that enabled her to have that corner of her life.

    I’m not sure why the commenters aren’t getting this, because it’s really flaming obvious if you know a single damn thing about DV, and I’m talking the kind of knowledge that comes from watching certain TV shows. This is not a great mystical hidden understanding that’s hard to come by.

  4. says

    Re: the laptop, it is a very short distance from using a gun on someone’s possessions to using a gun on them. Guns have a single purpose: to make living things dead. This is true even if you are a hunter or keep a gun for self-defense. How anyone can watch someone using a gun and not think, “This is a death threat”…it just blows my mind. I guess it all goes back to non-survivor privilege.

    Even if it wasn’t a gun, it’d be wrong for all the reasons Maria said. Plus, I heard on Tumblr that she paid for it herself, cementing the action as theft. But the gun makes it so blatant.

  5. says

    Here’s what I don’t get. So many parents genuinely seem to think they have no responsibility whatsoever for how their kids turn out. Like, the kids were a product from a factory, and who can guess why they’re malfunctioning. Contrast that attitude with this person criticizing the laptop shooting father:

    http://mandyray.blogspot.com/2012/02/dear-dad-who-shot-his-daughters-laptop.html

    If I’d found out that my child had posted something so bold and upsetting on the internet, I would have reacted much differently.

    First of all, I would have looked at myself to try and figure out why he or she was so angry and felt the need to use so much profanity and so much loaded language. Usually, our children are a reflection of us, their parents.

    The last sentence is really important. People complain about kids not being responsible, but they don’t want to hold parents even partly responsible for how kids turn out.

    The girl’s FB post didn’t strike me as all that bad – hearing it alone, I’d give even odds whether she has a real complaint or is just venting because some of her friends don’t have to do chores. It was *entirely the father’s behavior* in the video (and in making the vid) that convinced me there’s something very wrong in this girl’s household.

    The linked blogger goes on to say that just being locked out of your child’s Facebook ought to be a sign that there are trust issues, and it’s up to the adult in the situation to fix them. Ya think?

    Again, not condemning parents who honestly just don’t know what to do for their teens and maybe make mistakes. It happens to the best intentioned parents. But the best intentioned parents do not make huge public issues out of a Facebook entry and shoot laptops. That’s reactionary ego-centrism, not “I’ve carefully thought what would be best to do for my kid in this case, since I want her to turn out responsible and good, and this is what I came up with.”

  6. Casey says

    Holy God, between the Emily Comb’s rapist victim-blaming her, the 7th grader getting suspended for speaking her native language, the transphobic as fuck bathroom bill, the reality TV shit, Kitty Pryde getting LOL TENTACLE RAPED while pregnant and the dad SHOOTING HIS KID’S LAPTOP…ugh, I feel like nuking something.

  7. Casey says

    Oh yeah, that Iris thing pissed me off, TOO! But I don’t know what’s worse, the actual device or the guys in the comment section whining about how MEN SHOULD HAVE A SAY IN ABORTION TOOOOOOO

  8. says

    Maria,

    Yeah, honestly it was the victim-blaming that rattled me the most. That it happened was horrible enough, but the guy’s attitude towards his own actions (and towards her) was just…I have no words.

    I mean, Jesus Christ, “hey, I’m really super sorry and would never have done it if I could go back…but I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong!”

  9. Casey says

    Spartakos: “hey, I’m really super sorry and would never have done it if I could go back…but I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong!”

    URRRRGH! I guess he just doesn’t realize how incongruous those statements are. *fumes silently*

  10. Azzy says

    I first saw the video of the laptop shooting through Reddit, and it made me sick.

    If your parenting methods involve resorting to a gun, then you have FAILED as a parent.

    I’ve been following Moniquill on Tumblr, and she’s pretty much said everything salient about the situation and how fucked up it is. I will not go back to that YouTube video again, because seeing that abusive dipshit getting praised for his temper tantrum is sending me into panic attacks, and I’m not entirely sure why.

  11. says

    Spartakos: I mean, Jesus Christ, “hey, I’m really super sorry and would never have done it if I could go back…but I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong!”

    You know how I read it? I thought he was saying he really didn’t realize he’d done anything wrong in the moral or criminal sense, but that now he realized he’d hurt her feelings, and he was sorry about that. Wow, what a Nice Guy.

    The saddest part, though? Is that he could be sincere. As I described last week, most of the rapists who do not lack empathy are going to be participants in a gang rape, most likely when they’re young and less experienced about life in general, and bonus points if the victim is on drugs of any sort, since most of the world seems to believe that makes her fair game for whoever wants her, anyway. Let’s face it: a lot of people would victim blame her for this. She blamed herself for years. If his attitude toward what he did wasn’t shared by anyone else, this would be a very, very different story.

  12. Casey says

    Azzy: I will not go back to that YouTube video again, because seeing that abusive dipshit getting praised for his temper tantrum is sending me into panic attacks, and I’m not entirely sure why.

    I feel the same way whenever people get all gung-ho on “parenting” like this (and corporal punishment). I get panic attacks, I mean. I just…worry/wonder how many kids are being abused. :(

  13. Juliana says

    Ug. I couldn’t even watch far enough on the dad’s rant to figure out he shot her computer, but even then I had problems with it.

    I could see another fifteen year old reacting to a (perceived) public insult with another public insult/beatdown, but this guy’s got to be forty or fifty. It just amazes me when a parent responds with such… immature means and still acts like “I’m a parent so I’m automatically right”.

    And after that I read he shot her laptop… ugh. I can’t imagine living in a house with someone who thinks that’s a legitimate parenting strategy.

  14. Azzy says

    Juliana: I could see another fifteen year old reacting to a (perceived) public insult with another public insult/beatdown, but this guy’s got to be forty or fifty. It just amazes me when a parent responds with such… immature means and still acts like “I’m a parent so I’m automatically right”

    YES! Thank you! If his daughter was acting childish, it was because she’s a child. But what’s his excuse?

    To be honest, red flags really started to be raised when he started talking about gratitude. Whenever I hear a parent talking about how “ungrateful” their children are, I immediately peg them as emotionally abusive, because that is exactly the kind of guilt-tripping rhetoric I was raised on by my grandparents. They always went on about how they were providing for me, and feeding me, and clothing me, and that made me unable to express any of my sadness or anger, or frustration, because it would have been “ungrateful”. Because whenever I did, my grandmother always told me to stop it, because I was upsetting her. That’s the extent of emotional support I received as a child: “Stop being sad, I don’t like it”– of course, that was when they weren’t outright laughing at my tears. And they wondered why I hid the fact that I’d been depressed and suicidal for the entirety of my teenage years.

  15. says

    Azzy,

    Great point, and I have a feeling it’s reliable. I make an interesting case study, because I had an abusive father and a wonderful mother. My father thought I was an ingrate, and said so often. When I asked him what I was supposed to be grateful for, he couldn’t come up with anything, so he decided I should be grateful he wasn’t a drunk. I shrugged and said – purely to illustrate the absurdity of what he was saying – he should be grateful I hadn’t ever stabbed him in his sleep.

    Interestingly, my mother never commented on my gratitude one way or another. I have tons of things to be grateful to her for, and grateful I am. Very, very grateful. In fact, you can all be grateful – this site emerged very much from her critical assessments of the TV and media we watched together when I was a kid, and her helping me overcome my youthful tendency to hold women *more* responsible for our part in perpetuating sexism than I held men.

  16. eldritchMortician says

    THANK YOU.

    So many people are praising this guy for shooting the girl’s laptop, and blowing off anyone who actually points out it’s abuse. I just had a pretty hefty argument with a friend about it. I just don’t understand why this guy is getting praise.

  17. says

    eldritchMortician,

    I think authoritarianism may be the reason. The Milgram experiment indicates most people tend to assume people in authority must be correct and should be obeyed – as if no bad leaders have ever existed repeatedly since the beginning of time, LOL. And then there’s emerging research into right wing authoritarianism (not referring to right wing politics, though there happens to be much overlap).

    The basic idea seems to be that most people either assume authority is always deserved, which is not based on either sense or knowledge of history, or they would rather not be responsible for decisions, so they always yield their decision making to an authority figure and rationalize it in a social Darwinist sort of way. (I vote for the latter.)

    Therefore, until confronted with (for example) video of Hilary Adams’ father beating the shit out of her for seven minutes, most people would never even consider that the child could be right, because that would violate their belief that authority is always right. Confronted with the film, many people still maintained the father was right.

    What frightens me about authoritarianism in humans is that AFAIK, we don’t see this attitude in other animals. Assuming our research is at all correct and well-interpreted, it seems animals realize the leader can be fallible, and they challenge each other for leadership fairly routinely. And honestly, many humans seem to understand this too. I’m interested in the research which suggests it may be a personality trait, because I’m thinking it’s a personality trait that’s not compatible with the continued survival of the species. Some people seem completely content to play follow the leader right off a cliff, and I’d just as soon not get dragged along with them.

  18. Casey says

    Jennifer Kesler: Confronted with the film, many people still maintained the father was right.

    Ugh, I got SO pissed off when one of the guys I’m friends with on YouTube made a video saying the Hilary Adams video was a work and she’s just an attention whore. UN-FOLLOW/BLOCK!

  19. eldritchMortician says

    Jennifer & Casey (not sure how to make the nice little links yet)

    Good points. It frightens me when my friend thinks that because the girl made a ‘curse filled rant’ online she somehow doesn’t deserve any consideration and if she was a writer/artist her work deserves to be destroyed. I suppose because I curse and get angry at nonsense things occasionally my novel should be destroyed. Ugh.

    Casey-good policy. Sadly we could argue and point out things that should be fairly obvious, and some people just will not listen, because ‘clearly’ parents are always in the right no matter what it seems. Makes me afraid for their kids.

  20. says

    eldritchMortician,

    You make the links by hitting “reply” under the comment you’re responding to. (It’ll put the code down in the comment box for you). “Quote” will quote the whole comment, but in the comment box you can edit it if you just want to quote a portion. :)

    Another thing is: teenagers get under people’s skin. It’s part of the growing up process (both the physical brain undergoing tremendous changes, and the social adaptation to adulthood). If you aren’t prepared to shrug off some of a teenager’s crap and choose your battles carefully, then maybe parenting just isn’t your thing.

    I have to ask myself: if this is how he responds to her cursing and ranting on Facebook, what’s he going to shoot if he finds out she’s dating a boy he doesn’t approve of, or trying pot or engaging in some activity her father doesn’t approve of?

  21. Sabrina says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    Indeed. The fact that he thought it was a great idea to use a gun(!!!) is freaking me out to no end. It’s not just that it’s abusive but it’s also so over the top I don’t even know what to say to this. If I were the daughter I wouldn’t feel save anywhere near him ever again.

  22. says

    Sabrina,

    I doubt she’s ever felt safe. He was seething with rage – shaking at some points – in the video. Now, he has, at the very least, taken the time to print the Facebook thing, decide to film the video and decide what he’s going to say, and set up his camera and gun. This is a few minutes, minimum, and I bet it was longer. Far from cooling off, he’s still visibly upset. This is not a healthy venting of anger, and it scares me just watching him.

    It’s also unhealthy in the physical sense, for him. The physiology involved in sustained rage is not good for the body.

  23. says

    One more thing: is there any way to keep someone from reading a FB post other than locking it to friends only and not putting that person on your friends list? That’s all I know of. If so, then she wasn’t really doing this publicly – she was ranting to her friends, and that is something teens do, or at least should be able to do.

  24. Sabrina says

    Jennifer Kesler:
    I doubt she’s ever felt safe.

    That’s what I figured. My comment was rather with regards to the future of their relationship cause “punishing” a child like that just makes no sense whatsoever if you’re hoping to get anything positive out of it. This is a man who consciously decided he’d destroy any sense of safety and trust between him and his daughter (or at least whatever might have been left after whatever form of abuse he might have shown earlier). I just can’t wrap my head around this.

    Jennifer Kesler:
    One more thing: is there any way to keep someone from reading a FB post other than locking it to friends only and not putting that person on your friends list? That’s all I know of. If so, then she wasn’t really doing this publicly – she was ranting to her friends, and that is something teens do, or at least should be able to do.

    In the video he explicitly said that she was posting this for friends only and the parents were blocked from seeing the post. He was only able to read it cause he was fixing some stuff on her laptop and probably thought it would be fun to check her facebook account with her login data. I feel it’s like he read her diary or private letters – and HE’s talking about “disrespect”!

  25. says

    Sabrina: This is a man who consciously decided he’d destroy any sense of safety and trust between him and his daughter (or at least whatever might have been left after whatever form of abuse he might have shown earlier). I just can’t wrap my head around this.

    I know you weren’t asking, but for the benefit of the audience at home: I don’t think he ever wanted her to HAVE any sense of safety and trust. Some people feel absolutely entitled to violate others’ boundaries anytime and in any way they like. The only reason they sometimes don’t is because they think they’ll be caught and disapproved of. In this case, he rightly calculated that society would approve. It’s entirely possible he was less affronted by this than he was thrilled to have an excuse to violate his daughter’s boundaries.

    And the violation of boundaries is DESIGNED to make you feel you have no privacy, you can’t escape, you exist only as an extension of his reality. Because that’s certainly how HE sees it, and it would suit him best if you saw it the same way.

    It’s a mindfuck extraordinaire.

  26. says

    Sabrina: He was only able to read it cause he was fixing some stuff on her laptop and probably thought it would be fun to check her facebook account with her login data.

    Riiiiight. He was just fixing the laptop and “happened” to open up Facebook, in the same way that video game just “happened” to fall into the shoplifter’s pocket, that spray can just “happened” to paint graffiti on the wall in front of the vandal, or that phone just “happened” to jump into an abusive boyfriend’s hand and display all its text messages.

    The fact that the girl is friends with both her parents on Facebook, but her dad knew to check and see what she was blocking from him, means that trust and security were destroyed in that household long ago.

  27. Casey says

    SunlessNick,

    Thank God the police and CPS came to look into things…I SHOULD NOT HAVE READ THE COMMENTS! “The girl probably called the cops out of spite”? Not to mention the top comment about how “It isn’t apparent the father threatened her existence. Oh wait, I guess he did ‘cuz he killed her INTERNET SOCIAL LIFE HURR DURR!” “I can’t think of any other way to curb this childish behavior”? YOU CAN’T THINK OF SOMETHING BETTER TO DO BESIDES FUCKING SHOOT SOMETHING!? I guess ‘cuz he didn’t murder her yet, it’s okay.

    God these people disgust me. This reminds me of when I was a kid (aged 7 to 10) and my mom thought if I went to therapy I’d eventually “just get over” my depression. She’d grill me after every meeting with me therapist and if I mentioned anything about the stuff she does, she’d yell at me for “making her look bad”.

  28. Red says

    There is a sense of satisfaction in destroying something that belongs to a person who’s angered you. It gives you a feeling of power. Of being in control.

    But we can’t. And we certainly shouldn’t use such a violent-certainly not in such a public fashion-means to get our point across.

    I have to question; of all the people ‘cheering’ this man for his actions, how many of them would actually DO IT themselves? If they found out that their teen was venting online to their friends? How many of them would resort to such methods? What would they hope to accomplish? Are those defending this man’s actions confessing that they themselves feel inept as parents and want a ‘quick-fix’ to whatever issues there are? Is that REALLY what we, as a society, need? Name the last time a ‘quick-fix’ of this nature ever left any positive, lasting results.

    ‘Quick-fixes’ are for parents too chicken, too lazy and too self-centered to put any effort into their parenting skills and actually THINK of alternate methods that would yield far greater, more positive results.

    BTW; on the Mandy Ray article; someone posted a link to the daughters response in the comments, but I can’t access it. Could someone post it here, please?

  29. SunlessNick says

    Casey,

    Oh wait, I guess he did ‘cuz he killed her INTERNET SOCIAL LIFE HURR DURR!

    Which he could have done by taking the computer away, if he wanted to deprive her of the means she’d used to misbehave/”misbehave” in that way. If he’d wanted to make it permanent, he could have given it away to someone or donated it to charity.

    Instead he chose the most violent means available to make his point.

    And if that’s not about threatening her, then what the fuck is it about?

  30. says

    Sylvia Sybil,

    Weeeell, you’ll notice this is all entirely Jordan’s side of the story. There’s no mention in any article I found on Bing that the police or CPS confirm they visited him. This is just crap he reported on Facebook, and it sounds to me like he’s desperate to get famous. He also claims he had to have a friend run reporters out of his yard, and I am doubting that (a) reporters came to his home and (b) he would run them off if they did and (c) he has a friend. It all sounds like pathetic, desperate bullshitting to me.

    Red: ‘Quick-fixes’ are for parents too chicken, too lazy and too self-centered to put any effort into their parenting skills and actually THINK of alternate methods that would yield far greater, more positive results.

    Word.

  31. says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    Point taken.

    And hearing there’s an ex-wife in the picture, and the girl has only been with him for a few months, makes me hopeful that even if this video isn’t “legally” child abuse, the mother can use it in a custody hearing.

  32. Red says

    I have to wonder; what are we REALLY teaching our kids when we pull cr@p like this? Are we hoping to ‘scare ‘em strait’ when we destroy their belongings? (yes, THEIR belongings. Despite what people say about how parents provide stuff, ultimately, it is their CHILD’S PROPERTY) Do we WANT them to respect or fear us? Because there IS a difference. This man’s actions are about instilling a measure of fear in his child, NOT about teaching the importance of respect for others. This doesn’t address the issue.

    It’s so much easier to do things like this than actually work on fixing whatever problem resulted in her vent.

    And honestly, I find it somewhat funny that all the MOST whining done by those who support this guys actions is done by ADULTS complaining how ‘easy’ kids today have it, etc. and how basically they ‘have no right to whine’ about such things. Puh-LEEZE. That has been an adult complaint since time immortal. I’m sure THEIR parents whined about the same thing when they were young, just as adults did about my generation, and my mothers generation and my grandmother’s generation. It is an age-old complaint. Get. Over. It.

    Who’s the BIGGER whiner in all this? The teenager who was venting about the same-old same-old, or the adult who lashed out in an immature fashion by destroying something that did NOT BELONG TO HIM?

  33. MaggieCat says

    Red:
    There is a sense of satisfaction in destroying something that belongs to a person who’s angered you. It gives you a feeling of power. Of being in control.

    But we can’t. And we certainly shouldn’t use such a violent-certainly not in such a public fashion-means to get our point across.

    I have to question; of all the people ‘cheering’ this man for his actions, how many of them would actually DO IT themselves? If they found out that their teen was venting online to their friends? How many of them would resort to such methods? What would they hope to accomplish?

    I suspect part of the problem is that yes, the idea is satisfying on a visceral level — who hasn’t taken a brief moment to think about doing something disproportionate and just plain mean to someone who’s making their life difficult, even if they’d never do it? — and they aren’t thinking it through to the natural conclusion because people are notorious for one-step thinking when they hear a story. It’s the same reason people will cheer for someone who quits their job by telling off their jerkass boss in the most public and insulting way possible but would never do it themselves because after that pleasant moment when they consider the impulse, the rational voice in their head thinks it through and realize it would utterly screw their life: they’d be unemployed and finding another would be difficult to impossible after the new place heard about the childish stunt at the last one.

    The step they’re failing to take here is that they aren’t realizing that this is a man who never got past that moment of rage. That a grown adult who is responsible for the welfare of a child cannot distinguish the fleeting moment of “I swear I’m just going to throw this computer out the window” and actually destroying the computer with a gun and filming it. I’d say that the destruction of property and invasion of privacy aren’t even the most troubling aspects here (both are clearly horrible, but comparatively speaking). The most frightening part is that this is someone who doesn’t have second rational thoughts, who’s incapable of not acting from an entirely emotional place, who in acting on what should be a passing moment of anger chooses a violent manner to do it, who then remains PROUD of his actions, and is supposed to be raising and protecting a child. That isn’t the description of someone I would trust to water my plants, let alone be a parent.

  34. Red says

    I was looking the vid comments amid all the cheers ( and thankfully jeers), someone thought to point out that this guy opened his daughter up to hate, trools, etc.

    That, right there, seems to be something the father didn’t take into serious consideration when he decided to do this; by making such a thing so public, he’s opened his daughter up to a flood of harassment from people who feel she’s a ‘bitch’ and ‘deserved it’.

    Regardless of whether you think she ‘deserved’ what her father did, NO ONE-certainlt not a teenager-deserves such public ridicule that could easily turn into serious harassment and even threats against her person over something so petty as a facebook rant. One of the MILLIONS that get posted on FB EVERY DAY and wasn’t much different from those others.

    She is FIFTEEN YEARS-OLD. And her father effectively put a target on her back with his irresponsible, over-reactionary response to all and any on the web who would deem it ‘acceptable’ to lash out at her in some form over such a petty thing. I can’t even BEGIN to imagine the humiliation she will very likely endure, if she hasn’t already, and at so young an age.

    I hope that the father feels that it’s worth it.

  35. says

    MaggieCat: The step they’re failing to take here is that they aren’t realizing that this is a man who never got past that moment of rage. That a grown adult who is responsible for the welfare of a child cannot distinguish the fleeting moment of “I swear I’m just going to throw this computer out the window” and actually destroying the computer with a gun and filming it.

    This is what I was trying to say earlier, but much better put. That he felt like shooting her computer when he read this rant is understandable. That he took the time to plan the shooting, the filming and everything else, and at no point cooled down and thought, “Maybe this isn’t quite the ticket” is what’s so alarming.

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