Links of Great Interest: Happy Friday!

desmond tutu letter
Daniel Craig: Bringing (attentive, sensuous) sexy back.

Add me to the list of people who don’t want to have sex with you.

To the right, you’ll see a letter to the editor written by Desmond Tutu about the US’ policy regarding drones and American citizens.

Jaymee has some wisdom to drop.

I think this opinion piece on “ladies” misses the racialized history of the word.

This teacher wants to ban LGBTQ students from prom.

“We’ve seen what happens when the LAPD investigates the LAPD.”

“There are a lot of misconceptions about mental illness and creativity, and about the death of Sylvia Plath. She was not a genius of a writer because she was mentally ill, she was a writer and a mother in spite of  her struggles with depression. She did not commit suicide because she was a writer, or because she was a mother, or because her husband left her. She took her life in the throes of a clinically diagnosed depressive episode, one in which she had experienced before several times in her life. In fact, her previous suicide attempts, and her hospitalization in a mental institute, occurred before she had children and before she met her husband.”

Comments

  1. says

    Great article on fat shaming! I love how some of the commenters are like, “Yeah, but here are links to studies showing that your obesity is costing me money!” The problem with all these studies is they assume that diseases which tend to correlate with obesity could be avoided if obesity was avoided, and therefore it’s fatness that creates these diseases and causes costs to rise. A lot of other studies, meanwhile, have failed to establish that fat causes these diseases. For years, they thought being fat caused polycystic ovaries, and then one day someone actually thought, “Should we test this ‘fact’ we’ve been throwing around for decades? Hmm, it’ll get me some grant money.” Lo and behold, it looks like polycystic ovaries cause weight gain, and we still don’t know what causes polycystic ovaries.

    What kind of stupid do you have to be to NOT realize that correlation provides no clue WHICH correlative factor might be the causal one, IF ANY? I mean, really.

    Re: Sylvia Plath – that article does such a great job of parsing out who she was as a person. She was not her suicide, nor her disorder. And in judging her, people need to understand that suicidal people are typically delusional, and genuinely believe others (even their kids) will be better off without them. Plath overcame and accomplished so much more than she succumbed to.

  2. sbg says

    Ugh, fat shaming. Like I don’t hate my fat ass enough on my own, everyone else feels they can make commentary too? It’s not helpful. My response to my mom saying, “Do you really think you need to eat that?” was to eat TWO of that, because food never judges that way.

    (Has anyone here actually been told they’re not fuckable? I have and it was really surreal and out of the blue. I think my response was, “Okay, thanks. Noted.” the first time because I had no interest in this person and had no idea why this information was being passed along, and “Well, the feeling’s mutual and it wouldn’t due if we all found the same type attractive, now would it?” — this one to my then boss, who should reallllly have not ever mentioned in casual conversation how he found me unattractive . I mean, whew, sexual harassment avoid…hmm.)

    (Side note, since I’m doing nothing but tangential comments anyway: loathe Jezebel’s comment format. Let’s never do that here. We’ll never have to, but still. Pinky swear?)

    Re: the Dormer article. I remember thinking early on that his whole manifesto sounded 100% believable and was in all likelihood true. No way in hell do I support his reaction to it, but I absolutely think he experienced some nasty shit in his LAPD career.

    And Desmond Tutu is an amazing human being.

  3. sbg says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    Also, I kind of suspect that if obese people are causing these major spikes in healthcare costs, maybe it’s because doctors shame the shit out of them when they go in for a pimple on their chins and are told if they just lost weight, they would feel better. Who would go to the doctor if that’s always the outcome? So, health issues are ignored to the point they’re serious and, therefore, cost more. I just think that’s got to factor in somewhere.

    IF.

  4. says

    sbg: (Side note, since I’m doing nothing but tangential comments anyway: loathe Jezebel’s comment format. Let’s never do that here. We’ll never have to, but still. Pinky swear?)

    Pinky swear! I can’t follow them at all. :)

    sbg: I remember thinking early on that his whole manifesto sounded 100% believable and was in all likelihood true. No way in hell do I support his reaction to it, but I absolutely think he experienced some nasty shit in his LAPD career.

    That seems to be the dominant view among people I’ve talked to in L.A., too. Another dominant view: that the police would be sure to kill Dorner if he didn’t kill himself. There’s a lot of local gossip and second-hand stories about LAPD racism out here that never reach the headlines. :(

  5. Amy McCabe says

    Jennifer Kesler: The problem with all these studies is they assume that diseases which tend to correlate with obesity could be avoided if obesity was avoided, and therefore it’s fatness that creates these diseases and causes costs to rise.

    One of the big nutritional issues in the US is that many of the poor only have high calorie, low nutrient food available to them. That is, food that may easily make you less hungry but doesn’t give you what you need to properly support the functions of your body. So, when we when people talk about “fat people” driving up medical costs, it isn’t nearly as simple as that. I mean, I’d really like the conversation to switch to “the unavailability of vital nutrients to underprivileged people is driving up food costs” which is a much more meaningful and truer to the problem. (Though the article is right in that the aging of the baby boomer generation is a MUCH bigger issue in terms of health care costs as is the fact that so many people have little access to preventative medicine and can’t afford a doctor when problems are minor and easier to treat at a lower cost.)

  6. says

    Amy McCabe: That is, food that may easily make you less hungry but doesn’t give you what you need to properly support the functions of your body.

    Is anybody even looking into the possibility that it’s malnutrition causing these problems rather than the presence of fat?

  7. sbg says

    Jennifer Kesler: Is anybody even looking into the possibility that it’s malnutrition causing these problems rather than the presence of fat?

    I’m sure there is, but who can hear them over the outcries of OBESITY EPIDEMIC OMGHALPWE’REDYINGOFFAT?

    There are major, major class issues at work, and a disconnect about those issues. I’ve said it before, but every health/wellness seminar (something that used to be pertinent to my job) I’ve ever attended that brought up nutrition all poo-pooed the idea that it’s not financially feasible for the people who desperately need these healthy and organic foods to actually get them. One nutritionist flat-out said she did not believe every single person in the western world couldn’t buy organic fruits and veggies/Greek yogurt in favor of regular, etc., just that they didn’t know how to budget properly to do so. Believe you me, if I hadn’t already been in the middle of a migraine, the headdesking would have triggered one.

    I dunno, maybe it’s because I grew up on government subsidized cheese blocks, powdered milk, funky peanut butter and mystery canned meat that I don’t find the correlations between obesity and nutrition and class here all that difficult to comprehend.

  8. says

    sbg: One nutritionist flat-out said she did not believe every single person in the western world couldn’t buy organic fruits and veggies/Greek yogurt in favor of regular, etc., just that they didn’t know how to budget properly to do so. Believe you me, if I hadn’t already been in the middle of a migraine, the headdesking would have triggered one.

    That person is either too ignorant to be permitted to have any authority over anyone ever, or they are empathy deficient. It’s not even an afternoon’s work to calculate minimum wages at full time, typical cost of rent, utilities, etc., and see that what some people have left over for food just isn’t going to last the pay period unless a lot of it’s spent on very cheap, crappy food.

    I know there will always be horrible people like this, but can we not as a society please stop promoting them and giving them jobs where they have authority? Can’t they be relegated to positions of harmlessness while everybody else who can actually be bothered to educate themselves or try to better the world gets on with things?

  9. Amy McCabe says

    Jennifer Kesler: Is anybody even looking into the possibility that it’s malnutrition causing these problems rather than the presence of fat?

    There is, just like their is a rapidly growing and convincing body of evidence that the bacteria biome in your stomach has a huge influence on your weight, but neither are getting the attention they deserve.

    SBG is right. If you were truly concerned about people’s health (and there is also some good evidence we Americans are getting less healthy) you would be an advocate of making proper nutrition available to everyone rather than just shaming people for their weight.

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