Reaction: Supernatural (7×05)

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There’s something about Supernatural that keeps me coming back. I’m pretty sure it’s not 100% eye candy, but stranger things have kept me with shows. So far, this season is still faring better than last season did (I *gasp* haven’t even bought the S6 DVDs yet).

Anyway. Onward!

While I had some serious issues with the premise of this episode, I enjoyed it. Maybe it was the mini Buffy reunion that made the whole witch war/divorce easier to swallow. Because, really, a woman scorned always goes after everyone but the man who scorned her because deep down she still loves him and it’s easier to murder other people whether they’re guilty or not, right? [insert eyeroll here]

There really was a lot wrong with this episode from several angles. The vengeful witch killing anyone and everyone but her husband, the lesbian friend pining after said witch and getting killed because of it, that one really bad acting scene of Charisma Carpenter’s “Nooo, not my paintings…” and following odd exposition that I doubt anyone could pull off it was that clunky, the random cuts to the Leviathan dude on the road (Wasted film, no?), the Leviathan dude in general (Seriously, that guy lacks gravitas. While I wasn’t thrilled with the psycho-killer glimpse we got when it was Misha Collins housing all of ‘em, at least I believe he could have been incredibly spooky, menacing and personal.), Sam and Dean conveniently being unable to kill these powerful witches, so they get off Scot free despite demonstrating being much more of a threat than poor Amy Pond, etc, etc.

I’m not entirely certain I believe a Leviathan would be that susceptible to a witch’s powers. Aren’t they some of the worstest things out there? Don Stark didn’t break a sweat whammying him. I suppose the spell was for the physical body? I’m sure someone has brilliant reasoning for me to say, “Oh, I should have thought of that.”

Aww, Bobby didn’t even get to be heard via phone this episode. It makes the Bobby-as-repository thing all the more apparent. :(

Sam’s sideburns are getting out of hand. In fact, they’re making me a little uncomfortable. Hair and makeup needs to do something about that.

They really didn’t consider that Maggie would hex them? Really?! Dean’s been on the receiving end with that whole razor blades in his gut thing, so you’d think he’d be ultra paranoid.

Things I did like:

The wall art in the salon. Seriously, it was very pretty. Also, I enjoyed the relative lack of blood spatter, and that the opening screamer was a dude.

The nightmare sequence of Dean’s, though a bit anvil-y, was a nice, clear shot of what’s eating at him. He killed Amy because she was what she was, and he suspects deep down he’s going to have to deal in unpleasant ways with Sam and The Body Formerly Known As Castiel Formerly Known As Jimmy Novak. What I don’t get is 1) how exactly Sam is so well adjusted – it doesn’t make that much sense to me and 2) since Sam is so well adjusted, why won’t Dean frigging pay attention to all the anvils dropping near his noggin and talk? It’s not like Sam’s being subtle. Sam rarely is. They’ve done this before, and it’s getting a little old. Dean would get into a big old snit at the thought of Sam keeping things from him, and yet … Yeah, yeah. That’s Dean. I, personally, am sick of it. I want the character to grow a little.

Of course, maybe he thinks if he fesses up about Amy, that will be a catalyst to make Sam go off the deep end again (Noticed no auditory hallucinations or self-hurt to keep Sam grounded this episode. See above re: well adjusted).

(Again, sorry about the parantheticals. I think it’s just a phase.)

I’ve run out of likes. Nothing really stood out, I guess.

SBG Rating: enjoyable fluff, so long as you don’t think too much about it.

Comments

  1. says

    Yeah, I got the impression it was “hey, gang, let’s put on a show of War of the Roses“, with everything but the occasional breaking-into-song of a classic musical.

    I’m still watching, but I’m also starting to find the “two brothers closer to one another than any skirt” thing a bit weird as they accelerate toward-and-past thirty. It seemed quite natural when they were 22 and 26, but at 29 and 33, you start wondering when they’re ever going to have real relationships outside the one they have with one another. Instead, they’re becoming more and more invested in the relationship, losing the few outside people they had (Bobby, Jo, Ellen, Rufus, Campbells, Bela, Ruby, half-brother Adam, Castiel – all gone, more or less), and it’s starting to feel a bit weird.

  2. Casey says

    CaitieCat: Instead, they’re becoming more and more invested in the relationship, losing the few outside people they had (Bobby, Jo, Ellen, Rufus, Campbells, Bela, Ruby, half-brother Adam, Castiel – all gone, more or less), and it’s starting to feel a bit weird.

    Sounds like the writers are kowtowing to the Wincest shippers.

    • Maria says

      Is it supposed to be a kind of meta-commentary? I don’t know the series, but that sounds like it’s got to be incredibly unhealthy.

  3. says

    Casey: Sounds like the writers are kowtowing to the Wincest shippers.

    Oh, I think that’s fairly clear, especially given the much-reduced roles of Bobby and Castiel this year (though I’ve heard somewhere that Misha Collins may have asked for a reduction in Castiel-time because the voice is giving him throat problems): this season is for those who just can’t get enough of the wangsty-Dean-and-Sam-sit-on-the-car-and-drink-beer-and-talk-about-their-feeeeeeeeelings parts.

    Me, I’ve always been more interested in the MotW episodes, as I feel they’re more fun to watch, and don’t require the investment of time and energy like the mytharc eps do (see also X-Files and Heroes).

    Was the actor who played the witch on Buffy? I’ve never watched that series, though I knew that Marsters was on it from watching Torchwood and having friends mention it (also, YAY CAPTAIN JOHN! – also also, PUT THAT POODLE DOWN SIR!).

    Maria: Is it supposed to be a kind of meta-commentary? I don’t know the series, but that sounds like it’s got to be incredibly unhealthy.

    I don’t think it is; Kripke originally conceived the series as having a limited run, five seasons I think it was supposed to be, in which the whole arc would be revealed. I wonder if he’d thought ahead to the part where the “boys” would be in their thirties, and seeming kind of sad and pathetic rather than cool and superhero-y. But Kripke’s basically done now, and though there’s still a lot of holdover from the pre-S6 days, the show’s feel has changed a lot. The production values have taken a serious uptick in the last two seasons, but the stories have felt a lot more scattered, and it feels like we’re re-covering familiar ground, as the OP mentioned.

    Besides, Dean has become such an epic-level hypocrite by now that it’s almost painful to watch him try and be all moral and righteous, because we all know that every rule he ever puts forward is only for other people, never for the Special One.

    Erm, is my Sam-luurve showing? Maybe a touch. ;)

  4. sbg says

    CaitieCat: this season is for those who just can’t get enough of the wangsty-Dean-and-Sam-sit-on-the-car-and-drink-beer-and-talk-about-their-feeeeeeeeelings parts.

    Except, they’re not even executing those well. I love the brothers. I love that sick, codependent relationship. But only one brothertalk scene has really worked at all for me this year – second ep, make it stone and number one and build on it. And even that was just talk, because they’ve fallen back on bad patterns.

    It’s really like there’s a new batch of writers who see the characters on a surface level only. Dean loves pie. What could be better, character-wise, than to show him eating a whole pie? Despite his angsty manpain and guilt, there’s still lemon meringue. Hur hur hurrrrr. That’s so Dean!

    No.

  5. The Other Anne says

    Ya’ll certainly aren’t making me sad I stopped watching this show last year. I think I tend to be fans of ensembles or at least casts of 4 or more people. Anything less than that (And I mean full on regular, like with equal screen), and those characters have to be, well, not all white men the way SPN went. I loved Jo and Ellen and Ruby (the first) and a good half of the one-episode-wonder women of the show, like Kat from Asylum, whatsherface from Faith, Sarah, Lenore, I think Bella should have stuck around, Missouri, the hunter from the first episode of season 3 (whose husband dies), ….Urgh, I need to stop dwelling on how awesome the show could have been. There were SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES to branch out and diversify and shake things up and they didn’t.

  6. Patrick McGraw says

    One of the things that disappoint me as I slowly work my way through the series is how there is steadily less and less attention paid to folklore and mythology. One of the things I intially loved about the series was how much of it was figuring out “what kind of monster are we dealing with,” and basing things off real-world folklore and mythology well enough that a well-informed audience could figure things out before the characters did. (For example, the first-or-second season episode where the ghost is actually a tulpa, or the second season episode with the ghost of H.H. Holmes, who was buried in concrete.)

  7. SunlessNick says

    As opposed to a few episodes ago, where a kitsune was apparently a humanoid with long claws that eats human glands.

  8. sbg says

    SunlessNick,

    Yeah, considering the fans are a pretty dedicated bunch, you’d think some actual research could be put into things. I mean, I can get lost for hours in online (yes, not the best source of information) mythological creature listings, just for fun. It’s not hard to riff of actual legend instead of pulling it out of you-know-where.

    (Though kitsune were rumored to be able to take human form, it isn’t their natural one. No idea where the gland thing came from, honesty.)

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