The Tide … Is Not High On My List

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O RLY?

This doesn’t qualify as a post, I suppose. I don’t think I really need to say why this ad is a problem, do I? I mean, how sad is it that I have to side-eye a frigging laundry soap now? (Actually, Tide has effed up in the past.) I am pretty sure I’m taking my laundry to the river to beat it on the rocks before I buy Tide.

Between this Tide spot, those awful Jello Temptations ads and AT&T in general, it makes me wonder what actual parenthood in the US is, because it can’t be like these companies portray.

Up next: Velveeta. ;)

Comments

  1. Gabriella says

    So… mum is basically disppointed that the laundry cleaner worked because now her daughter can continue to wear her tomboyish clothes and NOT pink? Classy, Tide, classy.

  2. says

    All laundry commercials bug me. If I were an alien studying human life, I’d assume from the laundry commercials that the human male never touched laundry, ever.

    It’s sad. It’s like it’s still the ’50s in Commercial Land.

  3. StaudtCJ says

    I do have to give slight kudos to the fact that the mom, despite her own thoughts/feelings, tells the little girl that her car garage is beautiful, and apparently buys and maintains the distasteful (to her) clothing. That’s a big deal. There were lots of things my mom didn’t like about my preferences, but like this lady, she purchased the stuff *I* liked, not just the stuff *she* liked.

  4. The Other Anne says

    So, does this mean we’re going to get a commercial where a dad does his boy’s laundry and the boy ONLY likes to wear pink or something?

    All I can say is at least it didn’t question the child’s sexuality as though her clothes are a tell-all to whether she’s straight or not. And that’s kind of the best I can do. And I can guarantee if it was a dad and a boy-in-pink there would be a “joke” involving that.

  5. Dina Bow says

    JT: All laundry commercials bug me. If I were an alien studying human life, I’d assume from the laundry commercials that the human male never touched laundry, ever.It’s sad. It’s like it’s still the ’50s in Commercial Land.

    I don’t think a commercial that shows a guy doing laundry even exists. I remember a commercial that didn’t show anyone doing laundry but it still had to imply that the woman was the only one doing it. It showed the husband modeling his new pants in frount of the mirror and the wife was speaking to the camera. They had to make her say “when I do laundry…” instead of “when we do laundry…”.

  6. sbg says

    Dina Bow,

    Tide has another “My Tide” commercial with a young het couple folding piles of clean clothes. The female partner is the only one who really speaks to the actual doing of laundry, and it’s all “I” and not “we”. The dude is apparently only there for the punchline of “you suck at folding.”

    There is a newish Go-Gurt commercial that has a man preparing a sack lunch for his (also male) kid, which was kind of refreshing to see. I can’t seem to find it online.

  7. MaggieCat says

    sbg,

    Possibly, but not necessarily. It took years and years for me to notice that my mother and I have COMPLETELY opposite taste. Our situation was the reverse of the commercial, me preferring floofy dresses to anything else. You can quite clearly tell from my early childhood photos when I was old enough to make my opinion known by the sudden disappearance of all the OshKosh overalls. 9-year-old-me never took anything insulting from my mom’s attempts to convince me to consider buying jeans, just “Thanks for the suggestion, but no”, and my mother did a very fine job of not rolling her eyes where I could see her as I looked for barrettes and ankle socks that matched every individual outfit.

    I would, however, love an acknowledgment that after a certain age (say, 12 or so) some kids are expected to do their own laundry, thank you very much.

  8. says

    MaggieCat,

    No joke! 12yo me got pissy when other people did my laundry because they didn’t do it right. Bras in the dryer, non-colorfast towels in with the white t-shirts… And my college roommate didn’t know how to do her own laundry at all. She needed my help translating what “normal” and “delicate” meant on the knobs. That’s not right, her parents should have prepared her better.

  9. Gabriella says

    JT:
    All laundry commercials bug me. If I were an alien studying human life, I’d assume from the laundry commercials that the human male never touched laundry, ever.

    It’s sad. It’s like it’s still the ’50s in Commercial Land.

    This. Australian laundry soap commercials are that to a T, usually featuring a woman either affectionally condescending her husband and son/s who love to play in the dirt (cue manly images of football or rugby) or bemoaning the aftermath of a dinner party and its food/wne/lipstick stains, followed by a scietific-looking demonstration about how much better brand x is to brand y.

    In fact, I”m challenged now to find something OTHER than those two scenarioes.

  10. Casey says

    Gabriella: This. Australian laundry soap commercials are that to a T, usually featuring a woman either affectionally condescending her husband and son/s who love to play in the dirt (cue manly images of football or rugby) or bemoaning the aftermath of a dinner party and its food/wne/lipstick stains, followed by a scietific-looking demonstration about how much better brand x is to brand y.

    In fact, I”m challenged now to find something OTHER than those two scenarioes.

    More often than not, that’s pretty much every ‘Murrican laundry advert ever, too.

  11. sbg says

    MaggieCat,

    Hey, I was basing it on the context provided in the 30-second spot, but I guess where I see pretty blatant fake-praise, the little girl does seem perfectly oblivious, bless her little camo-wearing heart.

  12. says

    The really weird part is that I grew up thinking that laundry was a guy’s job because Dad always did it (Mom did the dishes and kitchen stuff)–and it’s totally opposite in our house, I do the laundry and my husband does all the dishes and kitchen stuff. Shakes head.

  13. MaggieCat says

    Sylvia Sybil:
    MaggieCat,
    No joke! 12yo me got pissy when other people did my laundry because they didn’t do it right. Bras in the dryer, non-colorfast towels in with the white t-shirts… And my college roommate didn’t know how to do her own laundry at all. She needed my help translating what “normal” and “delicate” meant on the knobs. That’s not right, her parents should have prepared her better.

    Heh, I had similar conversations back in high school when people would ask why my extracurricular logo-ed t-shirts didn’t get that icky cracked effect after the first few washes. I’d ask how they washed them and get a blank look and “…. I put them in the hamper? And my mom puts them on my bed?” At which point I’d sigh and offer to write a note if they seemed incapable of grasping basic instructions, while mentally wondering who lets their child hit 17 without being able to work a washing machine and what would happen when they moved out. On a gender related note, it happened just as often with girls as boys though!

    sbg:
    MaggieCat,
    Hey, I was basing it on the context provided in the 30-second spot, but I guess where I see pretty blatant fake-praise, the little girl does seem perfectly oblivious, bless her little camo-wearing heart.

    I may just have a tendency to assume that if a kid that young is so clearly going her own way rather than copying what she sees, she must not be getting criticism for it and not taking anything that is said too seriously. :-)

  14. sbg says

    MaggieCat,

    Er, I didn’t know how to work a washing machine when I was a freshman in college. I’d never done it before, and even if I had – I wouldn’t have known. You know those portable dishwashers you can get in an apartment that you hook up to the sink each time you use it? They used to make portable washing machines too (or maybe they still do, I don’t know) and that is what my mother did laundry with. For fifty years, and for various numbers of people from 13 down to 3. I knew how to wash clothes that way, though us kids didn’t do it often (my mom had a system). I had no idea how a regular machine worked, or how water temperature made a huge difference.

    So there. ;)

    We didn’t have a dryer for a long, long time, either. My mom would wash, and the kids would run baskets out to the clothesline, and in winter we had lines strung up in the warm room.

    Overshare 101, by SBG.

  15. Casey says

    sbg: Er, I didn’t know how to work a washing machine when I was a freshman in college.

    Er, yeah. I’m 21 and I still stink at doing laundry…[/feels inadequate] >_<V

  16. MaggieCat says

    sbg,
    You have a good point, and I apologize for speaking in such generalities. I have some lingering bitterness from those years that I haven’t gotten over. My parents scrimped and got by to keep me in a good school district, which had the unfortunate side effect of putting me at a class disadvantage (I went to school with a lot of doctors’ kids) in a place where getting a car for your sixteenth birthday was just expected and new ones weren’t at all uncommon. I spent a LOT of time clinging to the fact that being so coddled left a bunch of my classmates ill equipped for self sufficiency. I sometimes forget that isn’t always the case.

    (Did give me a hell of a leg up on that project where we were assigned a certain number of kids and a paycheck and had to figure out a workable budget for living expenses. Seriously, the horror some had at hearing how much money they were “making” was both hilarious and infuriating. The former because ohmygodthewhining, the latter because it was more than my parents made.)

  17. says

    MaggieCat: unfortunate side effect of putting me at a class disadvantage (I went to school with a lot of doctors’ kids) in a place where getting a car for your sixteenth birthday was just expected and new ones weren’t at all uncommon

    *high five* And did most of your classmates who got new cars for Sweet 16 total them within a few months, and it was like totally funny, and then they got ANOTHER new car? Or was that just my school?

  18. MaggieCat says

    Jennifer Kesler,
    Not that many, actually. I can only think of two off the top of my head — my friend’s older brother who smashed three (always well used, his parents were realistic, and he had to pay for his own insurance once it got ridiculous to carry him on theirs) and one who got a brand-new Volkswagen Bug (as did his twin) and then got another new one when he killed it like three months later.

    It’s quite possible that I didn’t hear about most of any others, since the people I was friends with weren’t the type to try and get themselves killed. I do remember several people who were irritated that their ‘overprotective’ parents made them drive Volvos, though.

  19. says

    Jennifer Kesler,

    Definitely not just your school. One of my dumbass classmates ran a red and crashed his car into my friend’s (who also went to the same school) within half a mile of the school. The accident was witnessed by the school superintendent who pulled over to help. Stepdaddy just wrote my friend a check for a new car (literally wrote her a check for thousands of dollars) and Dumbass was later seen driving a brand new one. The superintendent got his parking pass revoked but she couldn’t stop him from parking across the street and walking over. We were all pissed that Dumbass was rewarded for behavior that could have killed someone.

  20. Shaun says

    Jennifer Kesler: *high five* And did most of your classmates who got new cars for Sweet 16 total them within a few months, and it was like totally funny, and then they got ANOTHER new car? Or was that just my school?

    LOL. My parents bought my younger brother a new car when he turned 17, and when he smashed it replaced it that summer. They’re also affluent but insist they’re “middle class.”

  21. sbg says

    MaggieCat,

    No worries. I’d wager that the number of people like you had to deal probably edges out the number of people who didn’t know stuff for reasons like mine. Or maybe not – I dunno.

    All the car talk reminds me of how boggled I was when my younger brother grew up believing our parents were going to buy him a car, put him through school, etc. No idea how he managed that bit of entitlement, all things considered in my family’s background, and yet…

  22. Katherine says

    Well, my mum always did all the washing while I lived at home, and yet I still managed to realise that different stuff needs to be washed differently and separately. Probably because my mum talked about it and I know how to read washing instructions on clothes. I’m no expert but I never ruined anything. I don’t know how some people can be so oblivious to the work their parents do around the house.

  23. megs says

    I’m reading this completely differently. I’m seeing Tide go “HA! Our product is so good you can’t force your daughter to conform to your fashion sense, overly-pink-and-frilly-mom!” Granted, it does seem to be making fun of a grown lady for having more girlish choices in decoration and clothes, but she’s not taking up Tide, she’s lamenting it works so well. The daughter gives her a willfull look. I’m not really sure on the benefits of possibly mocking the mother-demographic, but it’s kinda funny. Not that funny, though, and sure does tie into the whole women wash clothes, and only women wash clothes mold that all these commercials have.

    Speaking of college, though, I am really surprised I’ve never seen a commercial for detergent where a parent is teaching their kid how to do laundry before they go off to school. Commericals seem to love that moment of letting go on behalf of teh parent and milking that for emotion. And that would be perfect to have a dad teaching his son. I’m pretty sure the reason we usually see a women is because there is a stereotype that women notice particulars and are experts at cleaning at home, while men will just anything that doesn’t make them look like complete slobs, or something. Which in the context of teaching a son how not to be a clueless, dirty-clothes-wearing freshman would be great. Dad’s secret for easy, clean clothes. I’m putting that out there so I can see some men washing clothes! Free idea for an ad, world!

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